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#120979 - 06/14/06 02:40 PM Re: Baby Boomer Research Discussion
Becky Offline
The Medieval Lady
Sonic Boomer

Registered: 02/16/00
Posts: 26894
Loc: Stony Brook, New York, USA
Cultural landscapes differ, even within the same country. For instance, I feel my children have been subjected to far more violent media content since 911 (not to mention having friends whose relatives died in the World Trade Center) than I ever was aware of as a child or even as a college student.

This hasn't steered them toward peaceful games.

I watched television as a child -- though not nearly as much as my children have done. And a few rounds of pinball (I was very bad at it) was about as close as I ever got to electronic gaming -- of course electronic gaming is a large part of my children's lives.

I think kids nowadays are used to more stimulation, more music, more toys, more travel, more visual content, and more information in general. They handle MORE than we did as kids. They probably sleep less, and they undoubtedly read less. Elementary school is harder now than it was in my day. High school is exponentially more difficult now than when I was in high school.

Kids don't have to be as creative in order not to be bored as they used to be. Does this make them less imaginative? Could be. Or does modern life give them more context, more symbols, more ideas with which to be creative?

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#120980 - 06/14/06 02:52 PM Re: Baby Boomer Research Discussion
chrissie Offline
Addicted Boomer

Registered: 01/15/05
Posts: 4404
Loc: london uk
Thanks gamegrrrl for coming back with some answers to my questions!

I can identify with a lot of what Greyfuss said - about basically, when young, having to find ways of entertaining yourself and having to be imaginitive. Although we had a TV in our house from my earliest memory ( we went through periods when we didn't have one!) we were limited to what we watched and encouraged to play games, play outside and generally find ways of entertaining ourselves.
I have always been interested in reading a good story & love films so for me a good adventure games contains aspects of these, I also like an intellectual challenge, I can spend a week trying to solve a particularly hard crossword, so can agree with The Haze on this - also TV for the most part is not that inspiring!

I am still curious though - has your survey so far shown that people over '40' veer towards adventure games generally? I wouldn't be surprised and comments so far have been interesting - but I still think that there needs to be a survey done for younger people - as so far it is assumed there is a difference in gaming tastes but e.g my sister, sister-in-law and their friends are younger and love adventure games!

smile

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#120981 - 06/14/06 03:11 PM Re: Baby Boomer Research Discussion
Jenny Offline
Grande Olde Dame
Sonic Boomer

Registered: 12/04/99
Posts: 31223
Loc: Northwestern New Mexico, USA
I didn't check out the research questions, Gamegrrrl, because I am way outside the target group, being a child of the 1930 era. But in the discussion here, I notice one thing that hasn't come up--several years ago we did an informal survey of our members, and it turned out that almost without exception those who were adventure game fans are also avid readers. I'm not sure how this would fit in with your research, but I thought I'd mention it....
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#120982 - 06/14/06 03:44 PM Re: Baby Boomer Research Discussion
Wollmaus Offline
Settled Boomer

Registered: 04/10/06
Posts: 422
Loc: Germany
I agree with you, Jenny - I think the love to read (like 'doing adventures in your head') has something to do with it:

I can read in my own timing, as slow or fast as feel, I can 'replay' passages in my head, I can spin the story further on whenever I want - the same I can do with adventure games.

I don't know how American media is working at the moment, but as we Germans tend to import a lot of that, I'd imagine it is nearly the same as over here: the quick-cuts (sorry, probably not the right expression) and scene-changes in films are getting ever more and faster. 'Slow' films (mostly French laugh ) are declared 'culture films' and run late in the evening or in the smallest cinemas. Media experts apologize with the attention span of the average viewer, which is now less than ?? (honestly, I have forgotten how many seconds - for me it sounded more like they were talking about infants.) We all speak of a 'fast-moving' time - slow is set equal to stupid and boring.

But, as GreyFuss said, we grew up in a time much slower and only our own imagination (and books, of course!) as entertainment. And as Becky pointed out, kids nowadays are used to a lot of stimulation - they don't read so much as nothing 'is happening', so it stands to reason that they prefer 'faster' games with more action.

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#120983 - 06/14/06 04:12 PM Re: Baby Boomer Research Discussion
gremlin Offline

Addicted Boomer

Registered: 11/06/01
Posts: 1626
Loc: Isle of Man
I would suggest that the reading -to- adventure game correlation bears alot more weight than the WWI/WWII/Vietnam (etc) -to- non-violent game correlation.

In general, avid readers have a much more developed sense of story and imagination, and are more willing to let a story develop, rather than wanting immediate gratification. The former is much more the focus of adventure games, as opposed to the immediacy of action/FPS games.

I think RPGs tend to hit a middle ground because of the more strategic character development aspects of the games.

Finally, I think that an individuals preference for a given genre depends much more upon their personal reaction to their environment, rather than any over-bearing cultural environment. Afterall, not everyone reacted to the Vietnam war/police action/conflict by becoming a beat poet or a hippy. wink

Gremlin

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#120984 - 06/14/06 05:12 PM Re: Baby Boomer Research Discussion
butterflybabe Offline
Addicted Boomer

Registered: 07/27/05
Posts: 2170
Loc: Mt Prospect , IL
I think I'm in the category of late boomers. I was born in 53. Although, thankfully, I've not been personally affected by any war, I have a basic moral objection to guns since I think they generally do society more harm than good, so I defintely steer away from any kind of killng in gaming. I dealt with it a little bit of shooting in one of the adventure games I played but I didn't know it was part of the game before I bought it.

I love games with stare at the screen puzzles vs fast action. Nancy Drew is my all-time favorite and I have played all of them. I don't like science and the 'adventure' of messing up in a game annoys me so I use WTs and UHS a lot.

Sorry if I went off the topic here but those are my thoughts. Good luck on your survey, gamegrrrl!

wave
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#120985 - 06/15/06 11:17 AM Re: Baby Boomer Research Discussion
wysewomon Offline
Addicted Boomer

Registered: 10/23/03
Posts: 3506
Loc: hunched over my computer
Becky, I have to respectfully disagree that high school and elementary school are more dificult these days. IMHO, schooling has gotten progressively less difficult since the 1800s. Some of those old McGuffy readers have literary references that college students wouldn't understand. And kids just aren't taught the basics like I was in my day: grammar and how to put thoughts together in a coherent way and suchlike. True, there are different things covered--we had no "tech lab" or computer lab, except for a terminal hooked to a mainframe that only the math & science geeks had any interest in, writing programs in Basic that were put out on long rolls of punch tape. But I'm shocked at the low level of expectation in Humanities.

Well, that has nothing to do with gaming... except to say, I agree that probably people who like adventure games are good readers!

WW
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#120986 - 06/15/06 12:56 PM Re: Baby Boomer Research Discussion
The Haze Offline
Settled Boomer

Registered: 02/12/06
Posts: 795
Loc: SE Michigan
It seems probable that both Wysewoman and Greyfuss are on to something. I have taught Sr. High
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#120987 - 06/15/06 11:36 PM Re: Baby Boomer Research Discussion
which2 Offline
Settled Boomer

Registered: 11/13/00
Posts: 167
Loc: Chelmsford, MA USA
I'm definately in the 'late boomer' catagory, born in 57, and I, too, have to believe that avid reading has much to do with the preference for adventure games. I love to read, usually devouring a book within a day or two. Three of my four kids enjoy reading also, although at a bit slower pace. Those three also like adventure games, but they enjoy hack and slash, shoot 'em ups, too. The fourth one wouldn't read a book if his life depended on it, and thinks adventure games are 'boring, silly and stupid'. He absolutrely adores RPGs and FPS games. The gorier - the better.

I also believe kids today use these action games in order to 'act out'. Consider this: All their lives they are sent mixed messages. Horror movies, shooter games and Reality shows about how to stab people in the back to get what you want abound. Yet at the same time society is censuring nursery rhymes and cartoons as being too violent! Kids are told to 'use your head' - then they are handed a calculator and a computer to work things out. I know...let's all watch Extreme Sports tonight - but did you know there are now advocates out there trying to do away with seesaws and swings because they're too dangerous? And they're winning!! duh woozy

What better way than to take out your frustrations and work through your confusion that by blowing things up or shooting things ? I think if I got that many mixed signals, I'd probably be an action gamer too. laugh Thankfully I grew up during a time when we were encouraged to use our creativity constructively, not selfishly and destructively. I know that has a major bearing on my preference for adventure games. I'd much rather use brains than brawn when I'm gaming.

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#120988 - 06/15/06 11:55 PM Re: Baby Boomer Research Discussion
Lotus777 Offline
Addicted Boomer

Registered: 03/12/06
Posts: 3270
Loc: Oregon
Where is this survey? I think I qualify as I, too, am a late boomer, born in 1953, an avid reader and "addicted" to the Adventure genre. I, also, dislike getting killed or killing in a game and avoid it when possible. I'm "game" to take the survey if steered in the right direction.. I would also like to know the results. Thank-you.
Lotus
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Lotus
Life is like a hot bath. It feels good while you’re in it, but the longer you stay in, the more wrinkled you get.

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#120989 - 06/16/06 12:03 AM Re: Baby Boomer Research Discussion
Becky Offline
The Medieval Lady
Sonic Boomer

Registered: 02/16/00
Posts: 26894
Loc: Stony Brook, New York, USA
Hey Lotus --

Here's the survey.

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#120990 - 06/16/06 12:20 AM Re: Baby Boomer Research Discussion
Lotus777 Offline
Addicted Boomer

Registered: 03/12/06
Posts: 3270
Loc: Oregon
Thanks Becky, I'm off.
_________________________
Lotus
Life is like a hot bath. It feels good while you’re in it, but the longer you stay in, the more wrinkled you get.

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#120991 - 06/16/06 04:46 AM Re: Baby Boomer Research Discussion
Melanie1 Offline
BAAG Specialist

Registered: 01/11/04
Posts: 5041
Loc: Bay Area, CA
This is an interesting topic, gamegrrl, and I love everyone's thoughtful and insightful theories and see the merit of them. smile The survey was fun too and I spent quite a bit longer than indicated on it also but enjoyed it so no problem.

I think the correlation to enjoying reading is the most important factor mentioned in genre choices. People who enjoy reading, enjoy using their minds and do so to relax, taking their time and moving at their own pace to savor or speed through some parts of the book or the game. The adventure game genre is the one most like reading. In fact, a lot of adventure games also have a lot of reading in them. There are usually journals and background info, letters and a defined story. Puzzles, another quiet and mental type of relaxation, are plentiful. RPG's share a lot of these traits, though they also have physical elements, and I think that's why they are also part of the mix that a lot of adventure gamers play.

In my opinion, the politics of the country in the era in which we grew up and part of our experience as young adults doesn't come into play in this choice. Our present politics affect our game choices to a much larger extent. At least they do in my case. smile

I like the thought about the way modern children grow up with all the toys and constant violent input more. It seems like a more valid theory to me and I think it plays a large part in choices of genre.

There's another factor also though that hasn't been mentioned and plays an important part of the choice of genre for a lot of us. There's a factor that we do not share with younger gamers in general. We are at the point where we may have age related physical problems like arthritis, bad backs, old injuries, etc. This makes a major difference in the games we choose to play. As a matter of fact, it's THE most important factor in my choices. There are FPS's that I would like to play but just can't. Lots of fast action and competing with a computer in reflexes and quick movement, is harder if not impossible for a lot of us, whereas that usually is not the case with those who are younger.
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#120992 - 06/16/06 03:26 PM Re: Baby Boomer Research Discussion
Carrie Offline
Settled Boomer

Registered: 06/30/01
Posts: 930
Loc: San Francisco area, Calif.
Off on a tangent~
Here's a personal experience that lends itself to Wysewoman's and Haze's suggestions that education (in the realm of the Humanities) has become less stringent:


While reading James Thurber's "Here Lies Miss Groby" (a short anecdote in the collection titled, "The Thurber Carnival"), I came across a term (for a figure of speech) I don't remember ever hearing nor learning in the 1950s & 60s: Metonymy.

Thurber: "There are several kinds of metonymies.. but the one that will come to mind most easily .. is Container for the Thing Contained...In a great but probably misguided attempt to keep my mind on its hinges, I would stare at the ceiling and try to think of an example of the Thing Contained for the Container."

Fantastic topic. Feel as though I've been given an essay topic (2000+ words minimum, please).
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#120993 - 06/16/06 05:33 PM Re: Baby Boomer Research Discussion
The Haze Offline
Settled Boomer

Registered: 02/12/06
Posts: 795
Loc: SE Michigan
laugh Since I have no compunctions about stealing other people's ideas, I feel you may all have combined to produce a topic for my advanced Senior classes next year. This will bear some contemplation, but if you hear loud groans from Southeast Michigan next Spring, you will all be at least partly to blame.
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If all the people were heroes, there would be no one to watch the parades.

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